Before the coronavirus pandemic, an Australian engineer captured the Southern lights while on a trip to Antarctica.

The world we live in is one spectacular place, full of wonders, waiting for us to discover them. Unfortunately, the travel restrictions due to the coronavirus pandemic have severely affected tourism and have prevented numerous adventures from happening.

An Australian engineer traveled to Antarctica before the lockdown, and his incredible photos of the Southern Lights illuminating the night sky have fascinated people!

The phenomenon is a result of the disturbances in the magnetosphere due to solar winds. In the clip, it all begins with strong bursts of yellow and green, and as the sky starts to lighten up, they slowly disappear over Davis Station.

  • Footage reveals the bursts of green in the sky above the Bureau of Meteorology’s Davis Station

  • It all started with bursts of yellow and green, and as the sky started to lighten up, the lights disappeared.

  • The phenomenon is caused by disturbances in the magnetosphere due to solar winds

Aurora Australis, or the Southern Lights, can also be seen from Tasmania, Point Lonsdale, in Victoria, and Queenstown, in New Zealand.

It is much more challenging to find a viewing location for watching the Southern Lights than for the Northern lights. The best time to do so is in September.

While the camera captures the shades of blue, purple, green, and red lights of auroras, photographers reveal that to the naked eye, many people see just bursts of white lights.

  • The Southern Lights, or Aurora Australis, can also be seen from Tasmania, Point Lonsdale, in Victoria, and Queenstown, in New Zealand

  • Finding a location for watching the Southern Lights is a true challenge

  • According to photographers, to the naked eye, many people just see bursts of white lights

Back in 2017, James Garlick, photographer, explained:

“To the naked eye, an aurora will look more like a white flickering light. It could be mistaken for a cloud. It’s not until you do a long exposure with the camera that the colors are revealed.”

During World Space week, Patrick James, BOM’s engineer stationed on Davis, shared the footage. Together with 23 other people, he has been stationed in Antarctica since October 25, 2019.

He said:   

“That timeline means we’ve completely dodged COVID-19 so far and literally have no idea about social distancing or what world awaits us on our return in March.”

  • The footage was shared by Patrick James, BOM’s engineer stationed on Davis.

  • He has perfected his skills to capture auroras while wintering in Mawson Station during another Antarctica stint working for BOM

  • He explained: “A sturdy tripod ensures long exposures remain sharp, while a good pair of gloves is vital for keeping the feeling in your fingers to operate camera buttons when it’s -25 °C”

Yet, he developed his skills to capture auroras while wintering in Mawson Station during another Antarctica stint working for BOM.

He revealed his secret:

“A sturdy tripod ensures long exposures remain sharp, while a good pair of gloves is vital for keeping the feeling in your fingers to operate camera buttons when it’s -25 °C.”

  • According to James, his main role at the station is maintaining and servicing the meteorological equipment

  • James Garlick, a photographer, said: ‘To the naked eye, an aurora will look more like a white flickering light’

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